future_of_work

Finding my voice

Annalie Killian

Apparently the answer to “How do you get to Carnegie Hall?”  is “Practice, baby….practice!” 

Well, I must be well on my way because I am getting good practice giving talks and speaking to interesting audiences all over the global village about my passion and interests, being:

Cultivating creative skills, personal expression and innovative eco-systems that create both business value as well as personal fulfilment.

Last month, I was in New York for my Aspen Institute Fellowship and had to do a short pitch about the Business/Social Innovation project I am working on to my fellow Aspen First Mover mates and at the New York offices of the design gurus, IDEO. My so-called New York debut! ;-))) 

On 3 May, I spoke at the sexy Next Bank Asia Conference in Singapore, hosted at the lovely new Red Dot Design Museum on Innovative Cultures of the Future, and last week at the CeBIT Social Enterprise Conference in Sydney, I discussed similar themes from the perspective of Social Enterprise transformation as an enabler for a Culture of Innovation, Collaboration and Creativity. I am sharing that slide deck here as a few folks have asked for it. 

 

Today, I had a lot of fun with a talk titled: Shift happened: What now? at The Thinking Women’s Network- a small group of senior executive women and board members hosted, by the lovely Lee-Anne Carson at the Australian Institute of Management. This talk was about:

How to cultivate our FQ- Future Intelligence Quotient – anticipatory thinking and making intelligent decisions in the present that will ensure value over the LONG term ( kind of the anti-dote to short-termism).

In this talk, I explored the forces that have shifted the entire world order,and what the implications are for organisation structure, nature of work and skill sets the future demands.

I didn’t use a slide deck but I have posted my speaking notes here. 

I am speaking at the following events in June/ July

  • 8 June at Google to a group of ex-agency Customer Centred Designers from companies like IDEO, Wall Street Journal, Nokia, BT Financial. My topic is awesomeness- so I think I might talk about the Aspen Institute Fellows and their amazing projects!
  • 14 June at “Inside the minds of the Entrepreneurs” hosted by HubMelbourne
  • 24 June at KPMG
  • 29 June at The Powerhouse Museum’s Fastbreak 
  • 26 July, at UTS ENGAGE on Productivity: Future Services and Industries

The more you practice, the better you get….and I am only about 1000 hours into mastery…only 9000 hours to go then hopefully I’d be as good as Dan Pink and Sir Ken Robinson …. so if you’re interested in me speaking to a group of people you are trying to influence around corporate culture, innovation, creativity, collaboration…why dont you drop me a note?

 

 

Clueless or Empowered

Those who know me well have probably heard me quote from The Cluetrain Manifesto ad nauseam, yet I am always astounded by how few people have read this life-changing book. It remains one of my most-referenced pieces of wisdom in navigating the digital revolution.

So, its good to see the folks at Forrester revisiting it and looking at contemporary practices that are emerging in the fulfilment of the vision and predictions of the Cluetrain Manifesto. I think a few of my colleagues in IT will be especially pleased by Empowered Chapter 12, whilst others will be wondering how on earth they are supposed to mitigate risks and keep costs down. 

Its good to see evidence that finally, leadership teams are beginning to actively grapple with these issues instead of ignoring it. And easy, it is NOT! But fun? Hell yes! Put it in your boss’ Christmas stocking, and if you ARE the boss, make sure you read this and change the way you lead. You will thank me for this later. 

 

by Josh Bernoff and Ted Schadler

Cluetrain

The Cluetrain Manifesto was an incredibly prescient book. It still amazes us that a book written in 2000, when blogs were novelties and Mark Zuckerberg was in high school, was able to identify the shift towards customer empowerment. Combine that with the insight that employees must directly engage with those customers, and you have a truly visionary work.

Because of when it was written, Cluetrain was not practical. A whole lot of people read it and said “Wow, this makes me think differently.” But it’s more inspiration than manual. Ten years later, its authors have seen their work’s influence blossom, but even in 2008, when we published Groundswell, it was hard to act on many of the insights in Cluetrain.

Well, welcome to future, folks. We didn’t set out to write Empowered to address the trends articulated so provocatively in Cluetrain — we were just following the idea that emerged from our research into the way technology empowers individuals, both customers and employees. But that research led us to this fundamental principle:

To succeed with empowered customers, you must empower your employees to solve customer problems.

Looking at this, it seems very Cluetrain. Specically, Cluetrain theses 53 and 56: There are two conversations going on. One inside the company. One with the market. . . . These two conversations want to talk to each other. They are speaking the same language. They recognize each other’s voices.

We have started to get a fair number of questions about it from others who find some of these thoughts familiar. We will be talking about it in our speech to the Web 2.0 Expo audience in New York today. But for the rest of you, here’s a little closer look, the call and response.

Cluetrain thesis 50: Today, the org chart is hyperlinked, not hierarchical. Respect for hands-on knowledge wins over respect for abstract authority.

Empowered Chapter 1: “Your staff are going to be coming up with solutions on their own . . . management’s new job is to support and empower employees.”

Cluetrain theses 8, 9, 10 and 18: In both internetworked markets and among intranetworked employees, people are speaking to each other in a powerful new way.These networked conversations are enabling powerful new forms of social organization and knowledge exchange to emerge. As a result, markets are getting smarter, more informed, more organized. Participation in a networked market changes people fundamentally. . . . Companies that don’t realize their markets are now networked person-to-person, getting smarter as a result and deply joined in conversation are missing their best opportunity.

Empowered Chapters 3-6: “[In the United States, people generate] more than half a trillion impressions [on one another about products and services every year.] . . . Solving customer problems, making customers happy, and harnessing their power to talk about it is marketing.”

Cluetrain thesis 41: Companies make a religion of security, but this is largely a red herring. Most are protecting less against competitors than against their own market and workforce.

Empowered Chapter 12: “[L]ocking down technology doesn’t work so well. . . IT has two new jobs: 1. train and educate information workers about how to keep themselves safe. 2. Help [employee innovators] assess manage, and mitigate risks associated with their projects.”

We could go on, but there’s no need. We promise you, we didn’t set out to rewrite Cluetrain, we set out to create a practical manual for today’s connected world. In that world, though, the shout that is The Cluetrain Manifesto has become the reality of customers and employees empowered by social, mobile, video, and cloud technologies. Cluetrain’s ideas are now practical and actionable, but the details are a bitch. Empowered looks at the world of the 2010, complete with Twitter, Sharepoint, and Google App Engine, and tells you what to do. It’s a management manual for the age of the empowered customer.