Month: July 2008

Highly productive leaders- 10 common observed principles

Just watched Robert Scoble interview with Matt Rissell, solution-hero of SMEs and founder of TSheets, an online timetracker service.The most interesting part was Matt’s discovery when he interviewed 100 CEO’s to learn what “tools” they used to be productive and effective, he found no commonality. But then, he had a new insight when he discovered there were common principles in the way they operate. Below I have summarised the salient points out of the interview. ( I note that Matt has started vlogging in instalments on each of these over at his blog too- so go there for more detail)Modus operandi highly effective CEO’s – 10 observed principles:1. Passion – you have to “want”. 2. Surround yourself with excellent people and don’t be afraid they will outshine you. That’s the point!3. Create an environment where great people can succeed. Its not easy to hire the best, and then you need to keep them and charged with a continual re-casting of the vision. The context matters. A story from the Roman Empire was shared about how 2 workers differed in productivity- the most productive was the one who was not building a temple, but working on building the most powerful empire!4. Simplicity – low tech can be faster. Choose your tools carefully. http://www.jot.com was very popular. 5. Know your “why” from your “want” – your inner motivation.

6. Recognise what your “secret sauce” is. What differentiates you from the next person/ leader? One guy thanked his “genetics”- he has a lot of fun and finds that attracts people because people want to be where there is fun!
7. Make your decisions be GREAT (which is not the same as make great decisions). A bad decision is better than indecision or a state of analysis paralysis. Move forward all the time.
8. Balance – not much elaborated there but its kind of obvious that too much obsession will kill the fun!
9. EXECUTE! – start every day with one clarity about one thing to achieve for that day and then do it. Just one – don’t be a slave of a to-do list. (If you can do that, that will be 365 achievements in a year- how many people can claim that?)
10. Build your own system. We are all different and not everyone’s systems for efficiency works for all styles.
Story told: Guy from Idaho said: A shotgun has much more energy and high-powered impact than rifle – but hopeless after 50 yards. A rifle with single focus and one bullet can reach much further with precision.

Trends observed1. Now small biz owners are looking towards internet to solve their business problems2. CEOs of very large corporations beginning to realise if they are not using the internet smartly, they are just going to be irrelevant.

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Highly productive leaders- 10 common observed principles

Just watched Robert Scoble interview with Matt Rissell, solution-hero of SMEs and founder of TSheets, an online timetracker service.

The most interesting part was Matt’s discovery when he interviewed 100 CEO’s to learn what “tools” they used to be productive and effective, he found no commonality. But then, he had a new insight when he discovered there were common principles in the way they operate. Below I have summarised the salient points out of the interview. ( I note that Matt has started vlogging in instalments on each of these over at his blog too- so go there for more detail)

Modus operandi highly effective CEO’s – 10 observed principles:
1. Passion – you have to “want”.

2. Surround yourself with excellent people and don’t be afraid they will outshine you. That’s the point!

3. Create an environment where great people can succeed. Its not easy to hire the best, and then you need to keep them and charged with a continual re-casting of the vision. The context matters. A story from the Roman Empire was shared about how 2 workers differed in productivity- the most productive was the one who was not building a temple, but working on building the most powerful empire!

4. Simplicity – low tech can be faster. Choose your tools carefully. http://www.jot.com was very popular.

5. Know your “why” from your “want” – your inner motivation.

6. Recognise what your “secret sauce” is. What differentiates you from the next person/ leader? One guy thanked his “genetics”- he has a lot of fun and finds that attracts people because people want to be where there is fun!

7. Make your decisions be GREAT (which is not the same as make great decisions). A bad decision is better than indecision or a state of analysis paralysis. Move forward all the time.

8. Balance – not much elaborated there but its kind of obvious that too much obsession will kill the fun!

9. EXECUTE! – start every day with one clarity about one thing to achieve for that day and then do it. Just one – don’t be a slave of a to-do list. (If you can do that, that will be 365 achievements in a year- how many people can claim that?)

10. Build your own system. We are all different and not everyone’s systems for efficiency works for all styles.

Story told: Guy from Idaho said: A shotgun has much more energy and high-powered impact than rifle – but hopeless after 50 yards. A rifle with single focus and one bullet can reach much further with precision.

Trends observed

1. Now small biz owners are looking towards internet to solve their business problems
2. CEOs of very large corporations beginning to realise if they are not using the internet smartly, they are just going to be irrelevant.

Magic catalysed

At 6 am this morning, snow falling outside and tucked under the warm doonah, I picked up the dreaded Blackberry (yes, I know, its not meant to go on holidays with you!), and then I leapt right out of bed!

I got my computer out of the suitcase and logged on to the hyperlink I got from Scott Schwertly at Ethos3 to see the result of two fabulous artists…mashed up!

In my previous post, I wrote about my excitement at discovering the amazing moving poetry of Taylor Mali, and connecting him to presentation genius Scott Schwertly and his company Ethos3 Communication.

Well my friends, my intuition was right.  Here is the result of their combined magical talents! Please vote for it if you love it as much as I do. Then send it to your friends and share the magic! What teachers make, by Taylor Mali, and presentation by Ethos3 Communication

Magic catalysed

At 6 am this morning, snow falling outside and tucked under the warm doonah, I picked up the dreaded Blackberry (yes, I know, its not meant to go on holidays with you!), and then I leapt right out of bed!

I got my computer out of the suitcase and logged on to the hyperlink I got from Scott Schwertly at Ethos3 to see the result of two fabulous artists…mashed up!

In my previous post, I wrote about my excitement at discovering the amazing moving poetry of Taylor Mali, and connecting him to presentation genius Scott Schwertly and his company Ethos3 Communication.

Well my friends, my intuition was right.  Here is the result of their combined magical talents!

Please vote for it if you love it as much as I do. Then send it to your friends and share the magic!

What teachers make, by Taylor Mali, and presentation by Ethos3 Communication

Chaos theory practiced – a Twitter case study

 

Media_httpcatalystfor_bgsha

Procrastination

My grand schema to chronicle the planning of the 2009 AMP Innovation & Thought Leadership Festival in this blog has been sitting in this draft box for months as I beaver away in the wee hours of the night working on the Festival – my dysfunctional “perfectionism ideal” the obstacle between this blog living an imperfect life “out there” and slumbering in the collective unconscious.

 

Because my whole weekend was consumed with delicious immersion in an exciting new world I never knew existed, thanks to a tiny tweet by one Chris Brogan, blogger extra-ordinaire,  

I am herewith catapulting over that self-hindrance and boldly publishing – its too good to keep till I’m organised! 

Unstructured play

The twitterings of the Brogan birdie in Boston, like the flapping of a butterfly’s wings in Brazil, instantly relayed to one maverickwoman on a sunny Saturday in Sydney, led me to Annarchy, who introduced me to

the genius of poet Taylor Mali ( imagine a 30 something cross between Patrick Swayze, Mr Chips and William Shakespeare)

which meant hours of exhiliarating inspiration on YouTube, which brought me to the Bowery Theatre in New York,  and the discovery of an artistic genre  Slam Poetry  that I had never heard of, which led to Mayhem Poets and their brilliant new venture pitch for a business called “Slam Chops”, which won the Microsoft IdeasWin Competition.You still with me? This created various other connections with my corporate “open innovation” work, but also “must-have” purchases on Amazon, which led to Facebook and 

an invitation to Taylor Mali to co-create magic with an unlikely partner, a Financial Services corporation, at the AMP Innovation & Thought Leadership Festival in Australia in June 2009.

Who knows where all this may end? I don’t, but what I DO know is that it WILL be powerful, and people will be inspired, our company could be transformed, and in turn, generations of customers and their children may be changed as a result of it!  Maybe the whole future of Australia!

Ripples
It was Taylor’s poem, “What teachers make”, that kept my inner matchmaker awash with ideas all weekend.
I hauled Scott Schwertly, Zen guru of pictorial storytelling, out of bed on a Saturday night in Nashville Tennesee.  Through Twitter, I knew that Scott’s company, Ethos3 Communication, is working on entries for the Slideshare 2008 presentation contest (They came second in the 2007 Slideshare contest with “Meet Henry“).  Knowing the history and impact of “Did you know/Shift happens 2.0”  –  winner of the 2007 Slideshare presentation contest, I thought a creative partnership between these two creative geniuses could help realise Taylor’s vision. I am happy to report that magic happened, and a union is being forged as we speak!
  

But, I couldnt help myself- had to go one step further.  

Through Facebook, I connected Taylor with Dan Pink, visionary wordsmith who speaks fluent “Corporatese” and compellingly explains in plain talk to business leaders why creativity and the arts is fundamental to future of their businesses.  I first met Dan at the Creativity World Forum in Flanders in 2006, where he shared the stage with Sir Ken Robinson (voted one of TED’s best presenters for his passionate plea for nurturing creativity in schools- that education connection!). Dan was chief speechwriter for Al Gore while he was in the White House, and we all know how Al Gore’s artful storytelling has convinced the world, one presentation at a time, that the time for action on climate change is NOW!  And Dan and Scott are vectors for spreading stories! 

Power of one idea
All the people I mention in this post, Mr Gore included, have had a catalytic influence on me and my work as a practical radical and corporate change agent, and I see it as nothing but a pleasure to help along the dreams and aspirations of others.  I am a child of Africa who worked in the crucible of peaceful transformation to democracy in South Africa. I know the power of one butterfly’s wings!

 

 

Chaos theory practiced – a Twitter case study

 

Procrastination

My grand schema to chronicle the planning of the 2009 AMP Innovation & Thought Leadership Festival in this blog has been sitting in this draft box for months as I beaver away in the wee hours of the night working on the Festival – my dysfunctional “perfectionism ideal” the obstacle between this blog living an imperfect life “out there” and slumbering in the collective unconscious.

 

Because my whole weekend was consumed with delicious immersion in an exciting new world I never knew existed, thanks to a tiny tweet by one Chris Brogan, blogger extra-ordinaire,  

I am herewith catapulting over that self-hindrance and boldly publishing – its too good to keep till I’m organised! 

Unstructured play

The twitterings of the Brogan birdie in Boston, like the flapping of a butterfly’s wings in Brazil, instantly relayed to one maverickwoman on a sunny Saturday in Sydney, led me to Annarchy, who introduced me to

the genius of poet Taylor Mali ( imagine a 30 something cross between Patrick Swayze, Mr Chips and William Shakespeare)

which meant hours of exhiliarating inspiration on YouTube, which brought me to the Bowery Theatre in New York,  and the discovery of an artistic genre  Slam Poetry  that I had never heard of, which led to Mayhem Poets and their brilliant new venture pitch for a business called “Slam Chops”, which won the Microsoft IdeasWin Competition.

You still with me? This created various other connections with my corporate “open innovation” work, but also “must-have” purchases on Amazon, which led to Facebook and 

an invitation to Taylor Mali to co-create magic with an unlikely partner, a Financial Services corporation, at the AMP Innovation & Thought Leadership Festival in Australia in June 2009.

Who knows where all this may end? I don’t, but what I DO know is that it WILL be powerful, and people will be inspired, our company could be transformed, and in turn, generations of customers and their children may be changed as a result of it!  Maybe the whole future of Australia!

Ripples
It was Taylor’s poem, “What teachers make”, that kept my inner matchmaker awash with ideas all weekend.
I hauled Scott Schwertly, Zen guru of pictorial storytelling, out of bed on a Saturday night in Nashville Tennesee.  Through Twitter, I knew that Scott’s company, Ethos3 Communication, is working on entries for the Slideshare 2008 presentation contest (They came second in the 2007 Slideshare contest with “Meet Henry“).  Knowing the history and impact of “Did you know/Shift happens 2.0”  –  winner of the 2007 Slideshare presentation contest, I thought a creative partnership between these two creative geniuses could help realise Taylor’s vision. I am happy to report that magic happened, and a union is being forged as we speak!
  

But, I couldnt help myself- had to go one step further.  

Through Facebook, I connected Taylor with Dan Pink, visionary wordsmith who speaks fluent “Corporatese” and compellingly explains in plain talk to business leaders why creativity and the arts is fundamental to future of their businesses.  I first met Dan at the Creativity World Forum in Flanders in 2006, where he shared the stage with Sir Ken Robinson (voted one of TED’s best presenters for his passionate plea for nurturing creativity in schools- that education connection!). 

Dan was chief speechwriter for Al Gore while he was in the White House, and we all know how Al Gore’s artful storytelling has convinced the world, one presentation at a time, that the time for action on climate change is NOW!  And Dan and Scott are vectors for spreading stories!

 

Power of one idea
All the people I mention in this post, Mr Gore included, have had a catalytic influence on me and my work as a practical radical and corporate change agent, and I see it as nothing but a pleasure to help along the dreams and aspirations of others.  I am a child of Africa who worked in the crucible of peaceful transformation to democracy in South Africa. I know the power of one butterfly’s wings!